Doug Ford visits new Humber College building

Ontario Premier Doug Ford visited the new Barrett Centre for Technology Innovation on Friday at North Campus, a visit that was unlisted on Humber College’s event calendar.

Ford was on campus with Sault Ste. Marie MPP Ross Romano and city councillor Michael Ford, who represents the ward Humber is located in.

“We’ve invested over $20 million in pre-apprenticeship training, like the General Machinist program at Humber,” Ford said in a tweet.

No IGNITE Halloween event this year, other options

IGNITE for the first time in several years will not hold a Halloween-themed event near the end of October and no reason was given as to why, but there are other party options throughout the city for those seeking excitement.

The popular Fiction nightclub is holding “Fright Night 2019” on Friday and tickets can be bought for the students-orientated event for $20 in advance or $25 regular. Everyone is welcome, including non-students.

A tradition for many is Halloween Haunt at Canada’s Wonderland. Tickets are about $38 plus tax with a valid student identification and can be bought in advance on the event page.

Into drinking? A Halloween-themed club crawl organized by Student Tours Canada will be hitting Toronto streets on Saturday and tickets can be bought via Eventbrite.


No IGNITE event

Frosh was confirmed safe by IGNITE’s executive director during an interview in July, but the Student Choice Initiative may have impacted other events that usually come throughout the academic year.

IGNITE’s staff director, Ercolé Perrone, said at the time that Frosh “may not look the same, it may not be two concerts”, but that it — and other large events that usually take place through the year — are still on the agenda.

“We will continue on with some of those signature activities and events, even with the unpredictability of the funding,” Perrone said, explaining that IGNITE is confident students will choose not to opt-out of the fees.

IGNITE has scheduled a Halloween party every year since the student union was re-branded as IGNITE in 2016. However, in 2017, the Halloween event was cancelled due to a five-week long college faculty strike.

It is unclear whether there was not enough funds in place from the Events and Opportunities Fee to hold the event or if there was another or a mixture of reasons.

Earlier this year, a source told The Avro Post that tickets for Frosh were discounted for all students because they were underselling. However, several weeks later, IGNITE’s Wild ‘N Out was reportedly well-attended.

IGNITE has not yet released opt-in numbers for the Student Choice Initiative, or SCI. When asked during an Oct. 4 press briefing about publishing the exact numbers, Perrone acted surprised that students would even be interested.

Several other student union’s have published their opt-in data, however, the only indication about the SCI for IGNITE is that about 80 per cent remained opted-in to a set of “Enhanced Student Experience” fees that were previously not optional, according to Humber’s president.

Perrone did not dispute the 80 per cent mark when asked by a Post reporter in October. There has yet to be a confirmation that IGNITE will release the data at any point, however, it could be at the delayed Special Meeting of the Members in January.

It is unclear at this point what other events could be impacted, such as the annual “Frost” that usually takes place in the new year. While Halloween might be skipped this year, the networking-focused LinkedIn Local series is back with a first event set for early November.

Trudeau conciliatory after election, will not form coalition

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who will keep the position after his Liberal Party won a strong minority, acknowledged on Wednesday his loss of support from the previous election with a conciliatory tone but ruled out a formal or informal coalition with another party.

It was during a half hour press conference at the National Press Theatre that Trudeau said his new cabinet will be sworn in on Nov. 20 and feature once again gender-equality as he aims to rebuild a broken image after a rocky year that saw Liberal polling drop.

Many analysts and political pundits have pointed out that a minority government — when a party receives less than 170 seats in the House of Commons — is not all bad.

Universal healthcare, the Canada Pension Plan, student loans, the official flag and more came about under Liberal minority governance, specifically Mike Pearson. Stephen Harper brought about tax reform, the Accountability Act and more with his first, minority term.

Trudeau confirmed during the early afternoon press conference that his government would charge ahead with the contentious Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project. The New Democrats, who are viewed as natural progressive allies to the Liberal minority, are opposed.

For his first moves, the prime minister said “our first priority will be to continue to lower taxes for the middle class”, legislation that could gain support from the Conservatives.

“We will also act on medically assisted dying as requested by the courts,” he added, a move that likely would be backed by the New Democrats.

Election results show that Liberals stay in power

The prime minister of Canada will remain Justin Trudeau, at least for the time being.

The intensity of the election results kept many individuals within Canada watching until the end of the campaign despite where they are from. 

The numbers of the seats were going up and down between the different parties that were involved in the Federal election. 

Within the first hour and a half, there were only five parties that filled the seats in the House of Commons, which were the Liberal Party, the Conservatives Party, the Bloc Québécois, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party. 

After the first hour and a half, there was a seat for a third-party organization, which managed to keep the vote until the end of the election campaign. 

The People’s Party did not manage to snag any seats in Ottawa.

The turnout in total came out to be 64.9 per cent and it was a loss of 3.3 per cent. 

The results came out with Liberals having 156 seats, Conservatives having 122 seats, 32 seats for Bloc Québécois, 24 seats for the New Democrats, three seats for Green party and one Independent, Judy Wilson-Raybould. 

The Conservative Party actually beat the Liberals in the popular vote because they had a total of 5,866,327 votes while the Liberals had a total of 5,609,477. 

After a four-hour election results period and the close amount of votes between the Conservatives and the Liberals, CBC declared a Liberal minority government at 2:09 a.m.

A year later: Dispensary owner reflects on legalization

(CUP) — While reflecting on the first year of cannabis legalization Thursday, Tokyo Smoke, a cannabis dispensary next to campus, said they have been able to educate Ryerson University students on forms and effects of cannabis.

Tokyo Smoke opened its dispensary right across from the Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre in April—and it was the first franchise in the city to sell cannabis products.

Josh Lyon,  a senior director of portfolio integration for Canopy Growth, said that educating consumers, including students, has been a “core tenant” of their business. Lyon has been working at Tokyo Smoke since 2015. 

“It’s about product knowledge, people are hungry for information. So, the hope is that you can come here and have an interactive experience.”

Lyon said that some frequent questions he has heard students ask have been about the difference between having a flower—cannabis buds that can be broken up to be inhaled through a joint or infused in edibles—versus a cannabis-infused oil or capsule and how different forms will affect them. 

Since the store has opened steps away from campus, it has resulted in numerous curious and excited students visiting, said Nina Caputo, a key lead and specialist at Tokyo Smoke. 

Madi Wong/THE EYEOPENER

“We especially noticed when frosh was starting [there were] so many people. But it’s really nice to see [and] get to know some of the students that come by and to kind of build those relationships, especially with your cannabis program at the school,” she said. 

Being near a university campus, Lyon said the store has strived to integrate themselves into the community by prioritizing safety and knowledge around cannabis. 

As of Thursday, edibles can now be legally sold and purchased in Canada. They are expected to be sold in dispensaries such as Tokyo Smoke in the near future.

“I think a lot of people are looking for another way to consume as opposed to smoking…We’re excited [and will] have it in the store by the new year,” said Caputo. 

According to Caputo, edibles will be sold in a variety of forms such as chocolates, gummies and drinks with regulations limited to 10 milligrams per product. 

Heading into the second year of cannabis legalization, Lyon said that there is a lot to look forward to and expect in the cannabis industry, including more factual research on how cannabis can be used and what it can do for people. 

“Just because we kind of snapped and said legalization is here, doesn’t change decades and decades of misinformation. That doesn’t change what we’ve been ingrained to think about cannabis and the people who consume,” he said. 

“I’m hoping as it continues to be open conversations like this, people take the time to educate themselves to form their own opinions and continue to reduce the stigma that still exists today.”

Story syndicated via the 
Canadian University Press.
Original story by The
Eyeopener's Madi Wong.

What happens if there is a minority government?

On Monday evening, Canada will make its choice for which party will form the next government, however, it may not be the party that receives the most seats that ends up running the country if they only win a minority.

If one party wins 170 ridings, which translate to seats in the House of Commons, than they win a majority and it’s game over: they form the next government and win have no issue passing legislation as long as their number remains 170 or above.

However, should one party win the most seats, but fall short of that magic 170, then they will hold a minority government and will need the support of at least other members of parliament or parties to pass laws.

A minority government is also vulnerable to losing power. If party A wins a minority but party B and C have 170 or more when combined, they could create a coalition and form a governing alliance.

This happened in British Columbia where a coalition of New Democrats and Greens overthrew the ruling Liberal Party which was reduced to a minority in the last provincial election there.

Growing talk in the media over the past week regarding a coalition between the Liberals and New Democrats has taken up a lot of air time, but Trudeau has dismissed the rumours, saying he is focused on electing a “progressive government”.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said on the weekend that he would “absolutely” be open to forming a coalition with other parties, such as the Liberals, to stop Andrew Scheer and his Conservative Party. He aimed to walk it back on Monday by stating his focus was on getting NDP votes.

The Liberals and Conservatives have been relatively tied in amalgamated polling as the New Democrats move up in polling. As of Wednesday morning, the Liberals and Tories are hovering around 32 per cent and the New Democrats have risen to 17.4 per cent.

At one point, it appeared that the Green Party would surpass the New Democrats when they were hovering around 11 per cent.

But percentages of the popular vote do not equal seats. Right now, the CBC Poll Tracker has the Liberals at 40 per cent and the Tories sit at 43 per cent for probability of winning the most seats but not a majority. The Liberals are at 11 per cent and Tories at 5 per cent for winning a majority.

This is what is most likely if there is a minority government, according to what the pundits and analysts are saying: if the Tories win a minority, the Liberals and NDP could team up in a coalition to form a “progressive” government.

However, if the Liberals form a minority, it is unlikely that there would be a coalition, but the New Democrats could be an ally to pass legislation.

Opinion: Consider the Green Party

OPINION

Chris Johnston,
Letter to the Editor
Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS
Opinion Policy

I am typically not one to discuss politics.

I am not a card carrying member of any party but I am motivated by the ongoing effects of climate change and young voters who demonstrated remarkable leadership and a clear vision of what they want during the climate strike from the elected officials after the upcoming election.

Please be aware that this is in the Green Party platform online.

The Green Party promises to “make college and university tuition free and forgive federal student debt”

This was also reiterated by Ms. May on CBC when she spoke with undecided voters on technology and innovation.

Hopefully, upon receiving this information your fellow university students will then pass it on to their parents and family for their consideration.

In this era of pocket book politics (tax credits and handouts to put money in your pocket offered by political parties), there is no other promise that offers to put more money in the pockets of students and the parents that pay to support them.

What difference can Canada make where we are such a small part of the climate change problem on a population basis but a big part of the problem on a per capita basis? We can assume a leadership role in the world by providing a model upon which other countries can move from fossil fuel emitters to using renewable energies so we can get to an overall zero carbon dioxide emission.

To those of you who plan to vote Green Party, please make sure that you cast your ballot on election day. 

To those of you who are considering a vote for the Green Party, please vote Green so that we can start on a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to make a livable planet well into the future. Using an analogy, I would rather fix the “leaky roof” now and not wait until later when the house is flooded and not fixable.

To those of you who do not plan to vote Green, if there was ever one election to change your vote, please make it this one.

Our climate crisis has worsened under the governments to date and we need the smartest peoples of all parties to work in “a cross-party inner cabinet to deal with climate change” and “limit global warming to a level civilization can survive, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on Canadians”, citing the Green Mission Possible.

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Chris Johnston

Federal race tight entering the final week of the campaign

ANALYSIS

With the Canadian federal election just over a week away, voters have now had a month to observe the campaign trails and familiarize themselves with this electoral seasons batch of potential leaders of the nation.

If you’re like me, you would have begun evaluating your options much earlier due to the tense nature of the political sphere and pressing issues of our modern world.

Early voting has already taken place on campuses across the country since Oct. 5, and the last day to vote will be on election day, Oct. 21.

The last election took place in 2015, where Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party won 54 per cent of the seats in the House of Commons. Representing Canada during the past four years, national and global politics has become very divisive.

The Conservative Party and the New Democratic Party have elected new leaders in Andrew Scheer and Jagmeet Singh respectively, in hopes to overtake Trudeau’s Liberals in this year’s election.

New entries also include the Bloc Quebecois current leader Yves-François Blanchet, and the newly formed People’s Party of Canada governed by former conservative Maxime Bernier. The Green Party is sticking with Elizabeth May who has been serving as leader since 2006.

But for now, let’s focus on the parties that are expected to obtain the most seats in this election: the Liberals, the Conservatives and the New Democrats.

It’s always easy to scrutinize the sitting party as their decisions, mistakes and dishonesty will undoubtedly receive national attention — and Trudeau has faced his attacks from both sides of the political spectrum.

From unpopular decisions such as the small business tax changes, scandals such as the SNC Lavalin affair, and criticism of his inability to take responsibility for his actions, all competing parties are hoping to pounce on this opportunity to win seats.

The Conservatives are expected to be the biggest competitor with new CBC polls giving them a slight edge of 140 seats to the Liberals 135 seats which wouldn’t constitute a majority but indicates a growth in opposing ideology.

This may also be attributed to the rise of Jagmeet Singh and the NDP who gained points on social media after his performance at the english language debates last week.

With the divisive nature of politics right now, the NDP and Conservatives may both steal seats from the Liberals as they are more pulled towards different sides of the “left vs. right” political spectrum.

Trudeau often points to Doug Ford and his unpopularity as premier of Ontario to deter voters from voting Conservative, while acknowledging that the rise in NDP popularity will make it easier for the Tories to win, stating “the only way to stop Conservative cuts is to vote Liberal.”

Things have been heating up during the campaigns, with a CBC analysis of press releases and tweets showing an increase in negative attacks from the Liberals, NDP, and Green Party.

This doesn’t quite match the data on the Conservative party that has put out the highest volume of negative attacks since the start of their campaign.

The Liberals are usually at the centre of the attacks, according to the CBC analysis, with the Conservatives pressing on taxes and affordability while the NDP, and Green Party are targeting the liberals environmental record. 

The Bloc Quebecois also seem to be playing a role as their polls in Quebec last week reached 27 per cent while Liberal support in Quebec dropped from 36 per cent in 2015 to under 34 per cent.

Though, the Conservatives aren’t immune to the division of votes as the PPC are expected to steal seats from the Conservatives. This is the first time a party with a more conservative ideology has entered the picture.

The numbers show a tight race but only election day will reveal who will form government and who could potentially hold the “balance of power”.

Conservative government likely as NDP rises: Polls

ANALYSIS

The Conservative Party moved ahead of the Liberals to take first place in terms of seat projection on Saturday, as the New Democratic Party rose to nearly 20 per cent in some polls — setting up the Tories for a likely minority government.

Jagmeet Singh and his NDP saw a boost following the official Leaders’ Debates on Tuesday and Thursday. Though the amalgamated Poll Tracker by the CBC finds the Tories and Liberals essentially tied near 32 per cent, the New Democrats have risen to an overall 15.8 per cent.

Reports across the country indicate the “#SinghUpSwing” is more than a hashtag, including right by Humber College’s North Campus in the riding of Brampton East, where The Hill Times reports there could be a significant breakthrough for the New Democrats.

The Liberals have suffered two major political affairs in the past year: the fallout of putting pressure put on the ex-attorney general to defer prosecution on SNC-Lavalin and the “brownface” scandal. Despite this, they were poised to snap a minority government.

This week, however, with gains by the Bloc Québécois threatening the Liberal strongholds in Quebec, the New Democrats building momentum in Ontario and the Tories shoring up support out west, Justin Trudeau’s chances of remaining prime minister are dropping.

CBC Poll Tracker late evening on Oct. 12, 2019.

The CBC finds that there is a 43 per cent probability of the Tories under Andrew Scheer forming a minority government, over 34 per cent for the Liberals. However, the pollster that manages the tracker, Eric Grenier, finds that if there is to be a majority, the Liberals are more likely to win it.

A “majority government” means that a party or coalition of governing parties hold an absolute majority of seats in the House of Commons and the leader of that party or coalition of parties is the prime minister. A coalition is when multiple parties team up to form a government.

If there is a minority government, then there could be a party or parties that hold what is known as the “balance of power”. This could mean a certain party joins in a coalition with another party or parties and votes with them or informally supports their government.

If the Conservatives win a minority, currently the most likely outcome of the Oct. 21 federal election, then the other parties could form a coalition to form a majority government and throw the Tories out of government. On the other hand, a party could join the Tories to create an absolute majority.

All these factors together with the unpredictability of the first-past-the-post parliamentary system, the tight race of the polls and the general uncertainty that comes with a federal election means that the result is essentially up in the air at this time.

Advanced polling has begun. Oct. 21 is election day.

WordPress.com.

Up ↑